Professional vs Amateur In the Digital Economy

“Professional” is typically referred to a person of “paid occupation.”  Given the market is willing to pay, there is an implied value or quality associated with the title.  Amateur on the other hand, is not paid or not as well paid.  And it is generally associated with a less standard or quality.

The logic is, if one is good, the market will value one’s product or service.  Supply and demand, the fundamental of a market economy.  The opposite however is also true: a diamond in the rough remains a stone.  Until it is discovered, polished, the perceived value is lost.

Surely, there must be more beyond title?  “Professional writer” may sound better than “amateur writer,” title alone is deceiving.  Now-a-days, amateur writers could self publish online and sell books without going through the traditional publishing channels.

What then?  How does one transition from being an amateur to a professional?  Beyond the title, quality reigns.  There is no shortcut to hard work.

Quality notwithstanding, the online market has blurred the traditional line between professional and amateur.  To transition, one can leverage the social networking and digital marketing available to compete the value of one’s products and services.

In some way, given the distance between the supplier and consumer has been slashed in the online market, it is easier for individuals amateur, or professional, to reach the consumers.  Ultimately, it is the consumers who still make the final decision.

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