Precisely Imprecise

Picture this conversation:

Person 1: What do you mean by that?

Person 2: You know what I mean.

Person 1: No, I don’t.

Person 2: Yes, you do.

When it comes to communication and meaning the world is not black and white but grayish.

To us, meanings are highly subjective. Depending on context and delivery, the meanings can vary greatly. Think how many ways, you can say “I love you” that means different each time.  Human communication, contrary to machines, is not an exact science.

Now-a-day, most of the tools we use to communicate to each other are precise. Computer, telephone, and other digital communication devices in their most basic form are made up of zeor’s and one’s. Very precise.  In fact, if the zero’s and one’s are off, the tools won’t work, at least not the way it was intended.

But machines are “dumb”  in the sense that they follow precise instruction and do exactly as instructed.  No room for error, ambiguity, or interpretation.

Human are different.  We are intelligent.  So we use tools to communicate.

Communication is how human transacts, business deals and politics evolves. Human communication takes place at a more complex level than machines do. It requires higher level thinking to decipher meanings and a lot more intelligence to grasp the vagueness that are inherent in human communication.

Judgement is an inherent human brain function that can not be replaced by machines.  It is foolish to substituting digital for human communication.   “Please listen carefully as our menu has changed, . . .”  When is the last time you actually spoke with a real receptionist on the other end of the line.

Sure with great leap in technological development, digital platforms are getting smarter and more encompassing.  More bandwidth for video, audio data. However given the imprecise nature of human communication, it is still light years away when machines can match what a human brain is capable of.

 

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